Waitangi Day

New Zealand’s national holiday, Waitangi Day, takes place on 6 February. It marks the anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealand’s founding document, in 1840.

Below is a list of resources that can be used in the classroom to learn about New Zealand’s history and the signing of the Treaty, and to reflect on the Treaty’s place in New Zealand’s society today.

Explore the treaty [website] by Waitangi National Trust (SCIS no 1749165)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1749165
This interactive and educational video produced by the Waitangi National Trust allows its viewers to explore the Treaty, starting with New Zealand’s Declaration of Independence, finishing with information about the final copy of the Treaty. Video is also available in Maori.

Maori history [website] by National Library of New Zealand (SCIS no 1700715)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1700715
Developed by the National Library of New Zealand, this website provides a list of resources that explore Maori history. Each resource includes suggested learning levels, including primary, intermediate and secondary levels.

Waitangi Day : the New Zealand story : what it is and why it matters by Philippa Werry (SCIS no 1697462)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1697462
Aimed at younger readers but providing an excellent resource for the whole family, this new book looks at the rich history behind Waitangi Day, universally recognised as New Zealand’s national day. It reviews the historic events behind the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 and charts the celebrations, tensions and protests witnessed in the years that followed, concluding with a summary of the Waitangi Day events held around the country on 6th February today. . . An engaging informative text gives children a very well balanced view of the significance and background to New Zealand’s celebration of Waitangi Day.

The Treaty in action : Nga mahi Tiriti by Susan Battye and Kiri Waitai (SCIS no 1651131)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1651131
Developed by New Zealand teachers and authors Kiri Waitai and Susan Battye, The Treaty in Action – Nga Mahi Tiriti is a comprehensive, photocopiable resource that supports teachers and students to explore the unique bicultural nature of New Zealand society that has developed from the history and signing of the Treaty of Waitangi to the present day.

The Treaty House by LeAnne Orams and illustrated by Roger Twiname (SCIS no 1331151)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1331151
Olley visits The Treaty House at Waitangi and gets a huge surprise when the house itself begins to answer his untold questions, such as who its occupants have been and what happened when the Treaty was signed. Olley is given a visual journey of the history of one of New Zealand’s most famous houses.

Kupapa : the bitter legacy of Maori alliances with the Crown by Ron Crosby (SCIS no 1734912)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1734912
The Treaty of Waitangi struck a bargain between two parties: the Crown and Maori. Its promises of security, however, were followed from 1845 to 1872 by a series of volatile and bloody conflicts commonly known as the New Zealand Wars. Many people today believe that these wars were fought solely between the Crown and Maori, when the reality is that Maori aligned with both sides – resulting in three participants with differing viewpoints. . . Captivating, comprehensive and thought-provoking, Kupapa addresses those realities, the complex Treaty-related reasons for them, and the cynical use of Maori by the Crown for its own purposes.

A new song in the land : the writings of Atapo, Paihia, c1840 by Fleur Beale (SCIS no 1194836)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1194836
Atapo, a young Maori girl, tells her story, from her capture and slavery as a young child through to her escape to the mission house in the Bay of Islands as a 14-year-old. Here she learns the new ways and language that means she is present at the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Although born into an important family her capture has meant she has lost her standing in her tribe, but she hopes the new skills she has acquired will mean she can return home with her head held high. Suggested level: intermediate, junior secondary.

Tangata whenua : an illustrated history by Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney, Aroha Harris (SCIS no 1691545)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1691545
A landmark publication, Tangata Whenua portrays the sweep of Maori history from Pacific origins to the twenty-first century. Through narrative and images, it offers a striking overview of the past, grounded in specific localities and histories. Fifteen chapters bring together scholarship in history, archaeology, traditional narratives and oral history.

Lost in translation : New Zealand stories edited by Marco Sonzogni (SCIS no 1450049)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1450049
This entertaining book of fictional stories engages with the idea of ambiguity creatively. This collection reflects our society in provocative, humane and intriguing ways.

For more useful resources, you can Browse by subject using the SCIS Catalogue. Searching by subject headings such as ‘Treaty of Waitangi’ and ‘New Zealand history’ will help to get you started finding resources relevant to Waitangi Day.

What resources are you sharing with your students for Waitangi Day?

All summaries provided by SCIS Syndetics, with the exception of websites.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *