Highlights of Connections 96

Here are the highlights from the latest issue of Connections, which is now available online. If you have any ideas for articles and would like to contribute to a future issue of Connections, send an email to connections@esa.edu.au. We’d also love to hear any feedback you have about our articles, which ones stood out for you, or what you’d like to see more of.

The new librarian: leaders in the digital ageVancouver Public Schools teacher librarians working together 

At a time when many school libraries are undergoing cuts, Vancouver Public Schools in the U.S. are revamping their libraries, with teacher librarians guiding schools and student learning into the future.

The importance of multicultural literature

Marianne Grasso discusses the importance of multicultural literature in the school library fiction collection, providing examples of books and digital content that promote multicultural perspectives and encourage global awareness.

Information and critical literacy on the web

Kay Oddone’s article provides useful tips on how to teach students to become info-savvy learners, and how to identify quality information in an online environment that often lacks an authoritative voice.

The value of social history

This article explains how social history can be taught in the classroom, with suggested lesson plans that encourage students to inquire and learn more about the social history in their families and in their communities.

Demystifying barcodes

SCIS cataloguer Julie Styles explains the differences between different types of barcodes and identifiers, including how these can be used to both locate and describe resources using SCISWeb and the SCIS catalogue.

Happy reading!

Waitangi Day

New Zealand’s national holiday, Waitangi Day, takes place on 6 February. It marks the anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealand’s founding document, in 1840.

Below is a list of resources that can be used in the classroom to learn about New Zealand’s history and the signing of the Treaty, and to reflect on the Treaty’s place in New Zealand’s society today.

Explore the treaty [website] by Waitangi National Trust (SCIS no 1749165)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1749165
This interactive and educational video produced by the Waitangi National Trust allows its viewers to explore the Treaty, starting with New Zealand’s Declaration of Independence, finishing with information about the final copy of the Treaty. Video is also available in Maori.

Maori history [website] by National Library of New Zealand (SCIS no 1700715)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1700715
Developed by the National Library of New Zealand, this website provides a list of resources that explore Maori history. Each resource includes suggested learning levels, including primary, intermediate and secondary levels.

Waitangi Day : the New Zealand story : what it is and why it matters by Philippa Werry (SCIS no 1697462)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1697462
Aimed at younger readers but providing an excellent resource for the whole family, this new book looks at the rich history behind Waitangi Day, universally recognised as New Zealand’s national day. It reviews the historic events behind the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 and charts the celebrations, tensions and protests witnessed in the years that followed, concluding with a summary of the Waitangi Day events held around the country on 6th February today. . . An engaging informative text gives children a very well balanced view of the significance and background to New Zealand’s celebration of Waitangi Day.

The Treaty in action : Nga mahi Tiriti by Susan Battye and Kiri Waitai (SCIS no 1651131)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1651131
Developed by New Zealand teachers and authors Kiri Waitai and Susan Battye, The Treaty in Action – Nga Mahi Tiriti is a comprehensive, photocopiable resource that supports teachers and students to explore the unique bicultural nature of New Zealand society that has developed from the history and signing of the Treaty of Waitangi to the present day.

The Treaty House by LeAnne Orams and illustrated by Roger Twiname (SCIS no 1331151)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1331151
Olley visits The Treaty House at Waitangi and gets a huge surprise when the house itself begins to answer his untold questions, such as who its occupants have been and what happened when the Treaty was signed. Olley is given a visual journey of the history of one of New Zealand’s most famous houses.

Kupapa : the bitter legacy of Maori alliances with the Crown by Ron Crosby (SCIS no 1734912)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1734912
The Treaty of Waitangi struck a bargain between two parties: the Crown and Maori. Its promises of security, however, were followed from 1845 to 1872 by a series of volatile and bloody conflicts commonly known as the New Zealand Wars. Many people today believe that these wars were fought solely between the Crown and Maori, when the reality is that Maori aligned with both sides – resulting in three participants with differing viewpoints. . . Captivating, comprehensive and thought-provoking, Kupapa addresses those realities, the complex Treaty-related reasons for them, and the cynical use of Maori by the Crown for its own purposes.

A new song in the land : the writings of Atapo, Paihia, c1840 by Fleur Beale (SCIS no 1194836)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1194836
Atapo, a young Maori girl, tells her story, from her capture and slavery as a young child through to her escape to the mission house in the Bay of Islands as a 14-year-old. Here she learns the new ways and language that means she is present at the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Although born into an important family her capture has meant she has lost her standing in her tribe, but she hopes the new skills she has acquired will mean she can return home with her head held high. Suggested level: intermediate, junior secondary.

Tangata whenua : an illustrated history by Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney, Aroha Harris (SCIS no 1691545)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1691545
A landmark publication, Tangata Whenua portrays the sweep of Maori history from Pacific origins to the twenty-first century. Through narrative and images, it offers a striking overview of the past, grounded in specific localities and histories. Fifteen chapters bring together scholarship in history, archaeology, traditional narratives and oral history.

Lost in translation : New Zealand stories edited by Marco Sonzogni (SCIS no 1450049)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1450049
This entertaining book of fictional stories engages with the idea of ambiguity creatively. This collection reflects our society in provocative, humane and intriguing ways.

For more useful resources, you can Browse by subject using the SCIS Catalogue. Searching by subject headings such as ‘Treaty of Waitangi’ and ‘New Zealand history’ will help to get you started finding resources relevant to Waitangi Day.

What resources are you sharing with your students for Waitangi Day?

All summaries provided by SCIS Syndetics, with the exception of websites.

SCIS is heading to NZ in March

It’s been five months since SCIS was last in NZ, and we’re getting ready to come back.

We’re hosting professional learning workshops in Auckland (15 March), Wellington (18 March) and Christchurch (21 March). These workshops – hosted by SCIS Manager Ben Chadwick and Director of Metadata and Library Services Rachel Elliott – are suitable for SCIS subscribers and non-subscribers, and are a great way to learn how to make the most of SCIS while catching up with other school library staff.

Not a subscriber? If you would like to check out what SCIS offers before heading to one of our open workshops, register for a free trial. You can browse through the SCIS catalogue, download records in SCISWeb, and check out how we can assist with your resource management and collection development. We’d love to have a chat and answer any questions at the workshop.

At each location, we will host two workshops: a free one-hour information session, as well as a three-hour workshop aimed for subscribers, Making the Most of SCIS. Places are limited for all sessions, so register here to secure your spot.

  • Making the Most of SCIS workshop ($55.00AUD)
    These workshops are open to all school library staff. The workshop offers an in-depth understanding of how SCIS can assist to provide a more effective library service for school libraries. Participants will enhance their understanding of SCIS as a database of consistent catalogue records for educational resources, created to international standards.This workshop includes materials and light catering.
  • SCIS Information Session (FREE)
    In each location, we are also hosting a one-hour session for non-subscribers who wish to know more about SCIS and the services we provide.

To register for our NZ workshops, click here.

For more information about our professional learning sessions, including our upcoming webinar series that will begin 16 February, click here.

If you have any questions, pop them in an email to our customer service team at scisinfo@esa.edu.au.

We hope to see you while we’re in New Zealand.

Australia Day ’16

With Australia Day just around the corner, we have compiled a list of Australiana resources including non-fiction, fiction and picture books, as well as other useful teaching resources such as interactive websites and DVDs.

CC BY 2.0  James Cridland https://flic.kr/p/3sWhGWAustralia Day marks the anniversary of the arrival of the First Fleet, but it also presents us with the opportunity to reflect on our history, culture and people. This year, to commemorate Australia Day, we have included a variety of resources that look at these aspects of our country. It provides a small snippet from a wide array of resources that are available to be shared with students for Australia Day. For more resources, use the SCIS catalogue to browse by subject, using subject headings such as ‘Australia Day’, ‘Australian history’, ‘Australiana’, or ‘Australian stories’.

You can also check out our Australia Day blog post from last year for a list of resources that look at the clash between European settlers and the Aboriginal peoples.

What’s Australia Day All About? [Online video] (SCIS no 1748373)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1748373
A short video suitable for primary school students, What’s Australia Day All About looks at how people commemorate the national holiday, and different perspectives that are held about the day.  The video encourages interaction and reflection by concluding with a trivia question.

Aussie Clue Cracker [Website] (SCIS no 1748506)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1748506
Aussie Clue Cracker is an interactive online game encouraging students to learn more about unique Australian icons, symbols and events. Users are shown 12 images that contribute to our national culture, and are given 11 clues to guess the correct answer.

Australia Day : History [Website] (SCIS no 1748485)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1748485
This informative website developed by the Australia Day Council looks at the history of the national holiday, and how and why it has been both celebrated and challenged.

Our World : Bardi Jaawi : Life at Ardiyooloon by One Arm Point Remote Community School (SCIS no 1484264)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1484264
This vibrantly illustrated picture book, written by students of One Arm Point Remote Community School, is a great resource that invites the reader into their community, sharing the culture and traditions of the Bardi Jaawi people.

A Concise History of Australia by Stuart Macintyre (SCIS no 1741554)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1741554
This book provides a concise, accessible overview of Australian history from our early history to today, including our social, political and economic history.

True Blue? : On Being Australian edited by Peter Goldsworthy (SCIS no 1347615)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1347615
Suitable for senior school students, True Blue? exposes students to a range of perspectives on Australian identity, and will encourage readers to reflect on what it means to be Australian – or if there is a concrete definition at all.

Australians All : A History of Growing up, From the Ice Age to the Apology
by Nadia Wheatley, illustrations by Ken Searle (SCIS no 1731022)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1731022
Nadia Wheatley interweaves over 70 real-life stories into the book, mixing her own narrative with biographies and first-hand accounts from various Australians in time, including well-known individuals such as Eddie Mabo.

Samson and Delilah [DVD] by Warwick Thornton (SCIS no 1475514)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1475514
Directed by Indigenous filmmaker Warwick Thornton, Samson and Delilah looks at the lives of two teenagers growing up in a remote community in central Australia, and the struggles as they leave their community and head to Alice Springs.

Australian Backyard Explorer by Peter Macinnis (SCIS no 1420539)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1420539
Australian Backyard Explorer, winner of the 2010 Children’s Book Council of Australia Children’s Book of the Year Award, tells the remarkable stories of individuals who explored the vast Australian landscape in the first 120 years of European settlement.

Australian Story : An Illustrated Timeline by Tania McCartney (SCIS no 1547510)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1547510
Australian Story places key moments in Australian history on a timeline, from the formation of our country and its flora and fauna to modern life in Australia. Filled with illustrations and images taken from the National Library of Australia’s digital collection, this is a striking visual account of Australian history.

The Unlikely Story of Bennelong and Phillip by Michael Sedunary (SCIS no 1698767)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1698767
This book tells the story of the friendship between Captain Arthur Phillip who led the First Fleet, and Bennelong, an Aboriginal man, despite coming from two very different worlds.

Why I Love Australia by Bronwyn Bancroft (SCIS no 1712314)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1712314
Bronwyn Bancroft visually celebrates the vast and diverse Australian landscape – both natural and man-made, expressing her deep feelings for the country.

Let us know your favourite books and resources to share with students for Australia Day – or books you love to read yourself.

Image: James Cridland (CC BY 2.0)

Webinars Term 1 2016

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Would you like to participate in SCIS training from the comfort of your own desk?

Over three Tuesdays, beginning February 16 and ending March 1, SCIS will be hosting professional learning webinar sessions to teach you how to make the most out of SCIS products and services. Webinars are open to all school library staff, and are a great way to learn more about how SCIS can assist your library’s collection development, with the opportunity to chat with fellow library staff in Australia and New Zealand throughout the session.

Sessions are approximately 45-60 minutes, and we are always happy to answer questions about SCIS products and services at the end of each session. Registration is essential.

Tune into the following webinars to find out how you can use SCIS not only as a resource management tool, but as a form of content curation to direct you  and your users to useful, educational resources for the library and the classroom.

Introduction to SCIS (FREE)
Tuesday 16 February 2016, 2-3pm AEST, 5-6pm NZST
A free overview of SCIS products and services and how they can help to organise resources in schools. This webinar includes an overview of how SCIS subscribers can request and download records.

Downloading SCIS records ($25.00)
Tuesday 23 February 2016, 2-3pm AEST, 5-6pm NZST
This webinar looks at how you can turn a set of resources, whether they are digital or physical items, into catalogue records that your students and staff can find and use for teaching and learning outcomes.

Search and selection on the SCIS catalogue ($25.00)
Tuesday 1 March 2016, 2-3pm AEST, 5-6pm NZST
This webinar looks at providing techniques for searching on the SCIS catalogue, and using SCIS as a resource identification tool.

How do I register?

Click here to register your interest, and join us on Tuesday 16 February for the first webinar in the series, Introduction to SCIS. As webinar participants will be tuning in from a number of different time zones, please check the registration link for your particular session time.

If you cannot make it to your session time, we will email a recording of the webinar to all registered participants within three working days.

For more information about upcoming professional learning sessions including workshops in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch, Melbourne, and Brisbane, please visit our Professional learning page.

Hope to catch you there.

The SCIS team

(CC0 image supplied by www.pexels.com)