Indigenous Literacy Day

Lottie gets caught reading Anita Heiss
Lottie gets caught reading Anita Heiss

The Indigenous Literacy Foundation was set up in 2005 by Suzy Wilson, with the aim of lifting literacy rates and opportunities for young indigenous children living in remote communities. The fund is supported by the Australian Book Industry and is a not for profit charity. You can find out more about the organization here.

Its main fundraising activity is Indigenous Literacy Day, which took place on 3 September this year. Many schools and libraries  hosted book swap sessions with book publishers and book sellers donating a percentage of sales to the fund.

Individuals who still wish to donate can Get caught reading

 

 

Here is a snapshot of what the Indigenous Literacy Foundation has achieved in 2014

120000 books supplied
120000 books supplied

The Indigenous Literacy Fund website is also a powerful resource, SCIS subscribers can download the catalogue record (SCIS No. 1534140)

What did your school do for International Literacy Day?

Connections 90

The latest issue of the SCIS journal, Connections, has been sent to all schools, and is available online.
Highlights of Connections 90 include:-

Taking Note of Nonfiction
Peter Macinnis, who presented the ‘Clayton’s list’ for the Eve Pownall award for information books, shares his insights into what makes a good information book.

Boori Monty Pryor with Dr Anita Heiss at BlackWords Symposium 2012.
Boori Monty Pryor with Dr Anita Heiss at BlackWords Symposium 2012.  courtesy of Blackwords

Learning Online: MOOCs for library staff
Martin Gray, a teacher librarian from Singleton High School, looks at how he used MOOCs to further his professional learning with two very different online courses.

BlackWords: Celebrating writers and storytellers
Writer and activist, Dr. Anita Heiss looks at BlackWords and AustLit, which are freely available for schools, and how they can assist in embedding Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures into the curriculum.

Following IndigenousX
SCIS’s Michael Jongen looks at the IndigenousX curated Twitter account and how it can help educators to hear a diverse range of authentic Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander voices.

Bring the Teachers In: Enticing teachers into the library
Library Manager at Wellington College, New Zealand, Brett Moodie, wanted to boost the profile of the library within the school and support the learning and information needs of staff.

 

Christmas in the library

It’s that time of year again. Christmas is rapidly approaching and end of year celebrations are just around the corner for Australian and New Zealand schools.

To read about some of the quirkier aspects of Kiwi Christmases past and present, schools can visit New Zealand History Online [SCIS 1486174]. New Zealand schools will also find Christmas resources on TKI. Schools interested in Australian Christmas traditions can visit the Australian Government site [SCIS 1637519]. Anyone looking for a more general history of Christmas could explore the BBC’s site [SCIS 1235815].

New Zealand students can write a letter to Santa from the New Zealand Post website. Australian students use Australia Post [SCIS 1637538], where there is also a range of interactive games and lesson ideas.

Wombat Divine by Mem Fox and Kerry Argent
Wombat Divine by Mem Fox and Kerry Argent

There are a number of Christmas themed websites with student activities from craft ideas, recipes, jokes, videos, music, stories, colouring sheets and interactive games. Primary Games: Christmas [SCIS 1637543], Disney’s Spoonful: Christmas [SCIS 1485028] and Activity Village: Christmas crafts [SCIS 1481860] are three of the best.

If you are looking for some creative ideas for Christmas displays in your library it is worth visiting the Creative Library Displays blog.

And we can’t forget about all those classic Christmas stories. Wombat Divine written by Mem Fox and illustrated by Kerry Argent [SCIS 1436850] is one of our favourites.

To search for further Christmas resources in SCIS select a subject search and search one of the SCIS headings listed below [SCIS login required].

Christmas

SCIS Subject search for Christmas
SCIS Subject search for Christmas

Narrower Term

  • Christmas entertainments
  • Santa Claus

Related Term

  • Jesus Christ – Nativity

Other useful subject headings

  • Carols
  • Christmas cookery
  • Christmas decorations
  • Christmas trees
  • Christmas music
  • Christmas services

Post by Clare Kennedy, RMIT industry placement 2013

Scootle update

Stacey Hattensen, Program Director, Content Services at Education Services Australia provided an overview of Scootle at the ASLA 2013 conference. Stacey’s presentation was titled: Scootle, supporting teachers to implement the Australian Curriculum, and guided participants through the latest developments of Scootle including:

Stacey encouraged teacher librarians to download the apps for Scootle [Android and iPad] and Scootle community [Android, iPad and iPhone].

Want to participate in creating a national collection?
Stacey also asked for voluntary reviewers with a good understanding of the Australian Curriculum, and a keen interest in digital and online learning. If you are interested in reviewing online resources and providing advice, or if you find something great that you think fits the Scootle criteria, get in touch at: stacey.hattensen@esa.edu.au.

Collections for connected learning

The Australian School Library Association national conference took place in the Term 3, 2013 school holidays in Hobart.

SCIS Manager, Pru Mitchell facilitated a workshop on the future of library collections, asking:

  • Is a collection of resources fundamental to the school library’s role?
  • What priority should be given to balanced, professionally selected and managed collections in emerging learning environments?

The workshop considered the assumptions behind these questions, reviewed the changes taking place in school library collections, and discussed associated resource and information management challenges.

Collections pre-survey

What issues are schools facing in resourcing the curriculum?

During 2013 SCIS has been conducting informal surveying of school library staff who attend workshops, asking them the free text question:
What are your current collection issues?

This survey closed at the end of Term 3 with a total of 85 respondents. The results were then coded, revealing what the researcher saw as 16 distinct issues.
While the frequency of each category being mentioned in a response is shown in the table below, the goal of the pre-survey was to collect a range of responses from which to prepare a more in-depth survey. The fact that respondents were attending a cataloguing professional learning activity at the time of completing this survey question, may well explain the high occurrence of ‘cataloguing’ as an issue.

What are your current collection issues survey responses
Collection issues survey responses. Sep 2013

 

Categories

  • cataloguing 14%
    catalogue records for resources are unavailable or unsatisfactory
  • e-resources 13%
    e-resources are not available,  or not managed or used appropriately
  • time 9%
    time to manage resources is limited and/or wasted
  • library system 7%
    system does not meet school’s needs
  • promotion 7%
    resources are not promoted to staff and students
  • budget 6%
    budget for resources is inadequate
  • staff 6%
    staff responsible for managing resources are not doing this effectively or do not exist
  • technology 6%
    technology required to use curriculum resources is not available and/or inadequate
  • search 5%
    finding what resources the school has, and where they are located, is difficult
  • weeding 5%
    weeding of resources does not occur regularly
  • access 4%
    access to resources is inadequate
  • age of collection 4%
    outdated resources are retained
  • balance 4%
    balance between print and digital resources is lacking
  • collection use 4%
    staff and students do not use school resources
  • OPAC use 3%
    staff and students do not use OPAC to find resources
  • professional learning 3%
    professional learning in resourcing the curriculum required

 What’s next?

You can contribute to the next stage of this research by responding to the survey at: www.surveymonkey.com/s/scisresearch.

Apps

What is an app?  App is an abbreviation for application software. Oxford Dictionary defines an app as “a self-contained program or piece of software designed to fulfill a particular purpose; an application, especially as downloaded by a user to a mobile device. The term app came into prominence with the introduction of the mobile devices and smartphones. Generally an app performs one dedicated task, or presents a discrete amount of format.

It has been suggested that Apps may be a new way to surf the net. Libraries are turning to apps to enable smartphone users to easily access their services.

With the ubiquity of tablets, smartphones and ‘phablets’ and the move towards ‘bring your own device’ in schools, apps are increasingly becoming resources used by students and teachers. GarageBand, Know your skin, iMovie are good examples of apps being used in Education.

Garage Band
Garage Band is an app being used in Schools

Schools are also using dedicated sets of tablets with story making, art creation programs and apps which cover many more curriculum areas.  There are periodic table and anatomy apps, language and math apps and many more. To find out more about educational apps Scoop.it! is a good source of information. Android Apps in Education and Apps for learning are two sites to explore.

More and more schools are buying apps and libraries are looking to catalogue these resources so that students and staff need to search in only one place to find school resources.

Apps is a new subject heading introduced to SCIS this term.

SCIS Subject Heading screenshot
Apps as a SCIS Subject Heading

 

Access to digital content

Recent SCIS workshops and presentations have focused on the challenges facing school libraries in their management of digital content. As a key service provider and partner with Australian and New Zealand school libraries SCIS is committed to helping schools deal with collection management issues, and provides catalogue records for e-books, websites, apps, audio books, learning objects and digital video.

All about ANZAC

Anzac Day, 25 April is a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand honouring the members of the Australian and New Zealand Army Corps (ANZAC) who fought at Gallipoli during World War One.

Anzac Day Subject headings
SCIS Subject Headings List structure for ANZAC

You can find out more on the ANZAC story from New Zealand History Online [SCIS 1594434] and from Australian Stories [SCIS 1030033] on the Australian Government site.  The National Library of New Zealand Services to Schools page has an introduction to Anzac Day [SCIS 1525095], as well as a wonderful gallery of primary sources [SCIS 1547997] under the Culture and heritage page.

Australian schools can search Scootle for ANZAC resources and teaching ideas. New Zealand schools can find ANZAC resources on TKI.

The National Library of Australia’s Trove provides links to digitised newspapers which you can search by State and newspaper title, and their picture library has a wealth of images. See Papers Past for New Zealand newspaper search.

There is more information at the Australian War Memorial in The Anzac day tradition and from the Australian Army website. Some other great resources on Anzac Day can be found on the ABC, from Many Answers as well as on Scoop.it!.

ANZAC biscuits
by Phil Cummings

Plans are underway to mark the 100 years since World War One with an Anzac Centenary 2014-2018.

To search for further ANZAC resources in SCIS select a subject search using one of the SCIS subject headings above [SCIS login required].

Our favourite recent addition to SCIS with an ANZAC subject heading is the beautiful picture book Anzac biscuits by Phil Cummings and illustrated by Owen Swan [SCIS 1598353].

Safe schools toolkit

The Australian Government, working in partnership with state and territory governments, the non-government school sectors and Education Services Australia have released a collection of resources for school teachers, specialist professionals, parents and students to develop safe and supportive schools.

The Safe Schools Hub  (SCIS no: 1601867) is underpinned by the National Safe Schools Framework, which aims to ensure that all Australian schools are safe, supportive and respectful teaching and learning communities that promote student wellbeing. The Hub provides the tools and knowledge that will enable all members of the school community to develop the skills to:

  •  nurture student responsibility and resilience
  •  build a positive school culture
  •  foster respectful relationships
  •  support students who are impacted by anti-social behaviour

Visit www.safeschoolshub.edu.au to explore a range of practical examples, resources and activities to assist you in making your school a safe and supportive school. You can also register on the website or email sshub@esa.edu.au to receive regular updates on news and resources for safe schools.

 

Safe schools toolkit
An introduction to the National Safe Schools Framework