Highlights of Connections 99

Connections

Here are the highlights from the latest issue of Connections, which is now available online. To download a PDF of the latest issue, please select this link.

It’s time: let’s improve schools’ perceptions of teacher librarians
Bev Novak recommends ways to encourage staff and students to make the most of teacher librarian skill sets.

Stopping the slide: improving reading rates in the middle school
After noticing a drop in borrowing rates as students entered the middle school, Narelle Keen gathered data and conducted student interviews to understand why. Narelle proposes recommendations to improve borrowing rates.

School libraries supporting literacy
Steph Ellis, librarian at Napier Boys’ High School, shares a range of library programs to promote a reading culture and increase literacy skills in schools.

An inquiry-based approach to exploring Australian history
Author Deborah Abela researched her family’s history and Maltese migrant history before writing her novel, Teresa: A New Australian. Deborah’s process can assist students undertaking historical inquiry.

School library spotlight: Melbourne High School
SCIS talks to Pam Saunders, Head of Library at Melbourne High School, about what’s happening in MHS’s library, including library programs and promotion.

The lowdown on authority files
Cataloguing librarian Doreen Sullivan explains how authority files containing name and subject authorities link relevant content within catalogues to optimise users’ search experiences.

SCIS is more
SCIS Manager Ben Chadwick introduces changes to the SCISWeb Licence Agreement, which will help to clearly identify the provenance of SCIS records.

Supporting Australian book creators
Morris Gleitzman discusses one of the simple pleasures of visiting school libraries: finding tattered, much-read copies of his own work. The ELR initiative makes it possible for authors such as Morris to continue producing books like these, while providing free access in libraries.

We welcome any feedback you may have about this issue, or any ideas you have for future Connections articles. Please email connections@esa.edu.au.

Happy reading!

ELR_2016

Highlights of Connections 98

Here are the highlights from the latest issue of Connections, which is now available online.

The importance of school libraries in the Google Age

We continue to hear about the lack of trained library staff in schools, despite ongoing research indicating that the presence of teacher librarians lead to improved learning outcomes. Kay Oddone highlights the many benefits teacher librarians can bring to the wider school, and why their role is integral to the learning of both student and staff.

Celebrating Children’s Book Week with the CBCA

Jane O’Connell, an independent director at the Children’s Book Council of Australia, looks at how school library and teaching staff can get involved in Children’s Book Week, which will be running from 20–26 August in 2016.

Using social media to support school library services

Helen Stower and Margaret Donaghue, from Mt Alvernia College’s iCentre, write about their experiences using social media as a communication platform for their school’s library. They highlight the importance of libraries sharing their stories, and discuss the need to develop social media guidelines in order to minimise potential risks.

Student perspectives on ebook and audiobook usage

Tehani Wessely surveyed students in Marist College Canberra’s middle school to understand student perspectives on ebooks and audiobooks, while also monitoring usage statistics. Despite low results, Tehani believes that we are still in the early stages of ebook and audiobook adoption, and acceptance of the technologies will continue in time.

Libraries, languages and free resources

Jill Wilson shares an overview of the Language Learning Space, a free online platform providing access to challenges and resources for languages students, and professional learning tools for Chinese, Indonesian, and Japanese language teachers. Jill also mentions several personal learning networks (PLNs) that language teachers can join.

Why SCIS prefers to catalogue with item in hand

SCIS cataloguer Doreen Sullivan outlines why we have a preference to catalogue with items in hand, rather than cataloguing blindly. Doreen explains the challenges of determining subject headings from minimal information, and highlights the importance of metadata elements such pagination and publishers.

We’d love to hear any feedback you have about Connections – please send us an email at connections@esa.edu.au.

Happy reading!

World Refugee Week

In May, the Oxford University Press announced the Children’s Word of the Year for 2016 was refugee.

The word was selected after analysis of entries from the BBC Radio 2 500 WORDS competition, which asked children aged 5-13 to submit a piece of fiction no more than 500 words in length. With over 123,000 entries, use of the word ‘refugee’ saw a 368% increase from last year’s entries.

World Refugee Week will take place from 19–25 June, with World Refugee Day on Monday 20 June. Following recent global events, it is important that students are aware of the refugee crisis. It is through learning about others that we generate awareness, empathy, and understanding. OUP have put together a great infographic, available on this page.

SCIS has catalogued a range of educational, interactive digital content aimed at sharing the experiences of refugees around the world.

The refugee project (SCIS no 1767814)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1767814
In every corner of the earth, ordinary people are forced to leave their homes, often without notice, often never to return. When they cross international borders, they are called refugees. The Refugee Project is a narrative, temporal map of refugee migrations since 1975. UN data is complemented by original histories of the major refugee crises of the last four decades, situated in their individual contexts.

Long journey, young lives: an online documentary (SCIS no 1343711)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1343711
The project features 40 ‘micro documentaries’ – each one a series of clips featuring either a refugee child discussing their experience or an Australian child sharing their thoughts on asylum seekers.

Against all odds (SCIS no 1767791)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1767791
This online interactive game is designed to teach users how people become refugees and what it is like to be a refugee. There are three games to play under the following headings: War and conflict — Border country — A new life. This site also includes further web facts about refugees, and information and links to additional resources for teachers.

Anatomy of a refugee camp (SCIS no 1767803)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1767803
Move the cursor around a plan of a refugee camp and discover what a refugee camp looks like and what all the buildings are used for.

Refugees and migration (SCIS no 1767807)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1767807
This unit of work, Seeking refuge — The journey, allows students to explore the human face of the journey undertaken by refugees and asylum seekers, and to create a digital story to reflect what they learn. Texts used include The Happiest Refugee: A memoir by Anh Do, Mahtab’s Story a novel by Libby Gleeson, the non-fiction text Children of War: Voices of Iraqi refugees by Deborah Ellis, and the graphic novel The Arrival by Shaun Tan. Includes teacher resources.

The boat (SCIS no 1764455)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1764455
This website links the award-winning interactive graphic novel, The boat, with classroom activities and background information. Based on the poignant story by Nam Le, this multimedia adaptation by Matt Huynh offers an insight into the Vietnamese refugee experience and is suitable for secondary students.

We’d love to hear about any resources you’re using throughout World Refugee Week – you can let us know about them via our cataloguing request form.

What’s happening in your school library?

Connections

We recently mailed out Connections 97 to schools in Australia. In this issue, we included an article by Chris Harte about St Aidan’s Anglican Girls’ School which has received great feedback. The article showcases the wonderful things librarians Jackie and Megan are doing in their makerspace, and provides tips for people eager to follow in their footsteps.

Following the interest in this article, we’re reaching out to all of you to see if you are doing exciting and innovative things in your library that you would be willing to share with our readers. This will be a great way to share what’s happening in Australian and New Zealand school libraries and inspire others.

If you have a story to share that may be of benefit to the wider school library community – whether it’s organising your library’s collections in an exciting way, doing innovative things to engage students with their learning, or doing interesting things to promote literacy, STEM subjects, or your library itself – we’d love to hear about it.

Please don’t hesitate to send us an email at connections@esa.edu.au if you’re interested in writing an article for Connections.

Highlights of Connections 97

Connections97

Here are the highlights from the latest issue of Connections, which is now available online.

Jackie French. Photo by Kelly Sturgiss.

1,000 reasons to support Australian book creators

Acclaimed author Jackie French provides insight into the life of children’s writers: responding to children’s letters, creating teaching notes, and devoting their life to writing. Jackie discusses how libraries facilitate the relationship between the reader and the writer, and how school library staff can help to aid in the growth of the Australian writing industry.

Library makerspaces: revolution or evolution?

Jackie Child and Megan Daley, librarians at St Aidan’s Anglican School for Girls, are using their makerspace to encourage tinkering and making in their school. Chris Harte talked to them about how they developed their makerspace, starting with small projects and building from there.

Exploring time and place through children’s literature

Tania McCartney reflects on the mind-opening nature of diverse children’s literature, looking at how exposure to other cultures and earlier times can impact children’s minds.

Country to Canberra: empowering rural girls

Hannah Wandel discusses how the Country to Canberra initiative is empowering young rural women to reach their leadership potential. Country to Canberra runs an annual, national essay competition, which gives winners the opportunity to travel to Canberra to connect with our country’s leaders.

The professional learning hat

Barbara Braxton writes about the importance of professional learning, arguing that if we are to encourage lifelong learning, we should practice it ourselves. Barbara provides recommendations to make professional goals meaningful and worthy of investment.

What’s so special about Special Order Files?

This article explains the benefits of cataloguing digital content, and shows how SCIS records for new electronic resources and digital collections can be downloaded in bulk from the Special Order Files page.

Happy reading!

You can also check out this video showing the print cycle of Connections. Thank you to Printgraphics for putting the video together.

Interested in having your writing published? If you have any ideas for articles relevant to the school library community, we’d love to hear them! Send us an email at connections@esa.edu.au

Digital resources to use on Harmony Day

Harmony Day is celebrated on 21 March, coinciding with the United Nations International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination, and following Victoria’s Cultural Diversity Week (12–20 March).

We have created catalogue records for the following digital resources:

Harmony Day : recipes for harmony [website], by the Australian Department of Social Services (SCIS no 1753238)

This website provides information about Harmony Day 2016 and information about the multicultural make up of Australian society. It also provides news feeds, access to free resources, and ideas about how to celebrate the day. Included is access to ‘Recipes for Harmony’, an online resource featuring recipes, cultural profiles and personal stories from every-day and high profile Australians. It also includes a teacher resource to accompany ‘Recipes for Harmony’, which provides example lesson plans, work sheets, ice breakers, and other classroom activities.

Y challenge : celebrating diversity [website], by the Australian Red Cross (SCIS no 1753460)

The Y program encourages young people to explore and celebrate Australia’s cultural diversity. It also helps them develop projects that promote fairness, respect for one another, participation and a sense of belonging among their school and local communities.The program is divided into three sections (Description based on online preview). The program is divided into three sections: Explore, Inspire, and Take action.

Harmony Day Stories (SCIS no 1753463)

Experience three stories that are part Australia’s past, present and future – Renata, Kofi and Anh. Download the Harmony Day Stories app today to watch each stories come to life with augmented reality, a cool new interactive experience (Taken from the app’s description). Available from both Apple and Google stores.

Share our pride, by Reconciliation Australia (SCIS no 1753479)

Developed by Reconciliation Australia, this website introduces its readers to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, cultures, and perspectives. ‘Share our pride’ was designed to raise awareness and break down cultural myths and barriers in order to build respectful relationships.

Roads to refuge, by the Australian Red Cross (SCIS no 1696317)

Roads to Refuge is designed to give students, teachers and the community access to relevant, factual and current information about refugees (Taken from website).


To find more resources celebrating cultural diversity on SCIS OPAC, you can ‘Browse by subject‘ using a range of different subject headings, such as: Harmony Day (Australia); Cultural diversity; Multiculturalism; or Cultural enrichment.  You can also check out the carousel on our homepage, featuring books that promote a variety of multicultural perspectives.

If you use any other websites or resources that celebrates cultural diversity and encourages cultural awareness, we’d love to hear about them. You can leave a comment here or send us a tweet at @schoolscatinfo.

Highlights of Connections 96

Here are the highlights from the latest issue of Connections, which is now available online. If you have any ideas for articles and would like to contribute to a future issue of Connections, send an email to connections@esa.edu.au. We’d also love to hear any feedback you have about our articles, which ones stood out for you, or what you’d like to see more of.

The new librarian: leaders in the digital ageVancouver Public Schools teacher librarians working together 

At a time when many school libraries are undergoing cuts, Vancouver Public Schools in the U.S. are revamping their libraries, with teacher librarians guiding schools and student learning into the future.

The importance of multicultural literature

Marianne Grasso discusses the importance of multicultural literature in the school library fiction collection, providing examples of books and digital content that promote multicultural perspectives and encourage global awareness.

Information and critical literacy on the web

Kay Oddone’s article provides useful tips on how to teach students to become info-savvy learners, and how to identify quality information in an online environment that often lacks an authoritative voice.

The value of social history

This article explains how social history can be taught in the classroom, with suggested lesson plans that encourage students to inquire and learn more about the social history in their families and in their communities.

Demystifying barcodes

SCIS cataloguer Julie Styles explains the differences between different types of barcodes and identifiers, including how these can be used to both locate and describe resources using SCISWeb and the SCIS catalogue.

Happy reading!

Waitangi Day

New Zealand’s national holiday, Waitangi Day, takes place on 6 February. It marks the anniversary of the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi, New Zealand’s founding document, in 1840.

Below is a list of resources that can be used in the classroom to learn about New Zealand’s history and the signing of the Treaty, and to reflect on the Treaty’s place in New Zealand’s society today.

Explore the treaty [website] by Waitangi National Trust (SCIS no 1749165)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1749165
This interactive and educational video produced by the Waitangi National Trust allows its viewers to explore the Treaty, starting with New Zealand’s Declaration of Independence, finishing with information about the final copy of the Treaty. Video is also available in Maori.

Maori history [website] by National Library of New Zealand (SCIS no 1700715)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1700715
Developed by the National Library of New Zealand, this website provides a list of resources that explore Maori history. Each resource includes suggested learning levels, including primary, intermediate and secondary levels.

Waitangi Day : the New Zealand story : what it is and why it matters by Philippa Werry (SCIS no 1697462)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1697462
Aimed at younger readers but providing an excellent resource for the whole family, this new book looks at the rich history behind Waitangi Day, universally recognised as New Zealand’s national day. It reviews the historic events behind the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi in 1840 and charts the celebrations, tensions and protests witnessed in the years that followed, concluding with a summary of the Waitangi Day events held around the country on 6th February today. . . An engaging informative text gives children a very well balanced view of the significance and background to New Zealand’s celebration of Waitangi Day.

The Treaty in action : Nga mahi Tiriti by Susan Battye and Kiri Waitai (SCIS no 1651131)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1651131
Developed by New Zealand teachers and authors Kiri Waitai and Susan Battye, The Treaty in Action – Nga Mahi Tiriti is a comprehensive, photocopiable resource that supports teachers and students to explore the unique bicultural nature of New Zealand society that has developed from the history and signing of the Treaty of Waitangi to the present day.

The Treaty House by LeAnne Orams and illustrated by Roger Twiname (SCIS no 1331151)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1331151
Olley visits The Treaty House at Waitangi and gets a huge surprise when the house itself begins to answer his untold questions, such as who its occupants have been and what happened when the Treaty was signed. Olley is given a visual journey of the history of one of New Zealand’s most famous houses.

Kupapa : the bitter legacy of Maori alliances with the Crown by Ron Crosby (SCIS no 1734912)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1734912
The Treaty of Waitangi struck a bargain between two parties: the Crown and Maori. Its promises of security, however, were followed from 1845 to 1872 by a series of volatile and bloody conflicts commonly known as the New Zealand Wars. Many people today believe that these wars were fought solely between the Crown and Maori, when the reality is that Maori aligned with both sides – resulting in three participants with differing viewpoints. . . Captivating, comprehensive and thought-provoking, Kupapa addresses those realities, the complex Treaty-related reasons for them, and the cynical use of Maori by the Crown for its own purposes.

A new song in the land : the writings of Atapo, Paihia, c1840 by Fleur Beale (SCIS no 1194836)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1194836
Atapo, a young Maori girl, tells her story, from her capture and slavery as a young child through to her escape to the mission house in the Bay of Islands as a 14-year-old. Here she learns the new ways and language that means she is present at the signing of the Treaty of Waitangi. Although born into an important family her capture has meant she has lost her standing in her tribe, but she hopes the new skills she has acquired will mean she can return home with her head held high. Suggested level: intermediate, junior secondary.

Tangata whenua : an illustrated history by Atholl Anderson, Judith Binney, Aroha Harris (SCIS no 1691545)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1691545
A landmark publication, Tangata Whenua portrays the sweep of Maori history from Pacific origins to the twenty-first century. Through narrative and images, it offers a striking overview of the past, grounded in specific localities and histories. Fifteen chapters bring together scholarship in history, archaeology, traditional narratives and oral history.

Lost in translation : New Zealand stories edited by Marco Sonzogni (SCIS no 1450049)
http://opac.scis.curriculum.edu.au/vwebv/holdingsInfo?bibId=1450049
This entertaining book of fictional stories engages with the idea of ambiguity creatively. This collection reflects our society in provocative, humane and intriguing ways.

For more useful resources, you can Browse by subject using the SCIS Catalogue. Searching by subject headings such as ‘Treaty of Waitangi’ and ‘New Zealand history’ will help to get you started finding resources relevant to Waitangi Day.

What resources are you sharing with your students for Waitangi Day?

All summaries provided by SCIS Syndetics, with the exception of websites.