End of an era for QLD

On 18 November 2010, on advice from the Queensland Department of Education and Training’s Library Services, SCIS sent out an email to Queensland schools to inform them that the Department will be discontinuing in-house SCIS cataloguing services as of 10 December 2010. The in-house cataloguing service has for many years catalogued resources sent in by Queensland schools, as well as providing support and training in use of SCIS.

Access to SCIS for QLD government schools

The Department will continue to provide ongoing support for Education Queensland schools to access SCISWeb and retrieve catalogue records via a bulk service subscription to SCIS for all Queensland government schools.

Cataloguing of Queensland school resources

Education Services Australia will continue to provide cataloguing services. We are currently investigating options for schools who wish to send resources to be catalogued and to ensure Queensland resources continue to be added to the SCIS database in a timely manner. As soon as we have more information we will advise schools.

Questions

If you have further questions about SCIS cataloguing services, please email the SCIS cataloguers at catinfo@esa.edu.au, or call 1800 337 405.
For any SCIS login problems or general SCIS enquiries, please email scisinfo@esa.edu.au, or call 1800 337 405.

Farewell and thanks to the QLD SCIS cataloguing agency

We would like to acknowledge the outstanding service that the Queensland Department’s Library Services have provided to SCIS and Queensland schools over many years. According to statistics available since 1996 a total of 25,550 learning resources have been catalogued by the QLD agency, an average of 1,825 records per year.

Particular thanks to the most recent team members Mary Gough, Frances Todd and Debbie Trollip and to all those over the years who have been involved in this team including Mary Lincoln, Edwina Dunn, Sam Andreata, Lisa Dorney, Jan Johnson, Peggy Hebblethwaite and June Richardson.

Feel free to record your experiences of the team and its service in the comments area or send us an email.

RDA changes from AACR2

During July and August 2010 SCIS cataloguers took advantage of the free trial period to preview Resource Description and Access (RDA), the new standard which is intended to replace the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR2).

SCIS will make initial preparations for the implementation of RDA by activating new MARC fields in our Voyager library management system when we upgrade to Voyager version 7 during the latter part of 2010. This will allow us to produce test records created according to RDA rules and evaluate the likely impact for schools. We will of course be consulting with school library management system vendors to ensure that any changes to SCIS records are compatible with school library systems.

RDA changes likely to have the most impact on school library systems are the replacement of the GMD with three new MARC fields: 336 (Content type), 337 (Media type) and 338 (Carrier type). For example a DVD title coded according to AACR2 as:

245 00 |a Avatar |h [videorecording]

would be coded according to RDA as:

245 00 |a Avatar
336      |a two-dimensional moving image |2 rdacontent
337      |a video |2 rdamedia
338      |a videodisc |2 rdacarrier

Most of the other RDA changes can be readily accommodated in the MARC fields currently used by SCIS. These changes will impact on data consistency rather than systems. For example in RDA the abbreviations N.T. and O.T. are spelled out as New Testament and Old Testament, but omitted in headings for individual books of the Bible. Thus a heading such as Bible. N.T. Corinthians becomes simply Bible. Corinthians.

For more information, including links to key presentations and articles about RDA, see the Australian Committee on Cataloguing.

RDA Developments

For those of you interested in following the progress of the new RDA (Resource Description and Access) standard, the following update was recently posted on the RDA discussion list by Deirdre Kiorgaard, the representative of the Australian Committee on Cataloguing to the Joint Steering Committee for the development of RDA:

The RDA toolkit will be published in June 2010. … Over a period of 9 months after RDA is released, US libraries will be conducting testing of RDA.  Information about this testing is in the RDA FAQ http://www.rda-jsc.org/rdafaq.html#11 and also on the testing website http://www.loc.gov/bibliographic-future/rda/.

Implementation in Australian and overseas libraries is expected in mid 2011. Internationally, the National Library of Australia is working with the Library of Congress, British Library, and Library and Archives Canada  to develop implementation strategies and coordinate implementation dates. Within Australia,  the Australian Committee on Cataloguing is preparing a plan for  implementation and training.

You can join the RDA discussion list from the NLA’s email discussion lists page, or view our earlier post on RDA hereAnn Chapman has also published an excellent introduction to RDA in the information science journal, Ariadne, the full text of which is freely available at: http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue49/chapman/.

Clickview enhancements in SCIS

Over the next month or so, SCIS will be undertaking a project to enhance existing Clickview catalogue records on the SCIS database.   The project will involve adding the ClickView global ID and 2 series statements to each of the 1400 Clickview records we have catalogued to date. Adding the global ID will provide each Clickview record with a unique identifier, which should aid matching of SCIS and Clickview metadata in local systems, and the series statements should facilitate searching.

To incorporate this new information into the records, we will be utilising the following MARC fields: the 035 (system control number),  the 500 (general note), and the 830 (Series added entry) fields. We will be using the 500 field rather than the 490 (Series statement) field because the series is not actually stated anywhere on the items. An abbrieviated example of the MARC coding for the enhanced records is below (note that this example record does not include all the fields that would normally appear in a SCIS record), and we’ll posting here and on the SCIS website once the enhancements have been completed.

clickview

For those of you wondering about RDA and SCIS…

book_store_on_Thames

As you may be aware, initial testing of RDA is to be undertaken by the U.S. National Libraries (The Library of Congress (LC); the National Library of Medicine (NLM); and the National Agricultural Library (NAL)).  The testing period was due to begin in July this year after the release of the online version of RDA and was projected to take approximately nine months.  However, there been have unforeseen delays in releasing RDA and so testing has not yet commenced.

At this stage SCIS (along with other national agencies) is still awaiting the outcome of the U.S. testing. We’re also closely monitoring the implementation plans of the national libraries including the National Library of Australia. Naturally before committing to a course of action regarding RDA, SCIS will need to consider the impact of any such changes on our users very carefully, and will also need to confer with library system vendors to ensure that any changes will be supported by school systems.  If you’re worried about RDA affecting the library records you download from SCIS, please don’t be – we won’t be making any changes until we are certain that our users will be able to support the new standard!

Those of you interested in undertaking a bit more research on RDA’s development and implementation might find the following sites interesting:

http://www.rda-jsc.org/rda.html – Created by the  joint steering committee for the development of RDA, this page contains background information and FAQs about the and projected implementation of RDA.

http://www.nla.gov.au/lis/stndrds/grps/acoc/rda.html – The National Library of Australia’s RDA information page contains information about the projected implementation of RDA by the National Library, as well as links to some interesting presentations on RDA and the conceptual models on which it has been based.

http://www.loc.gov/bibliographic-future/rda/ – The Library of Congress’s RDA testing page gives information about progression and methodologies of the testing being undertaken by the U.S. National libraries.

The gorgeous image I used for this post is of a book fair on the Thames, and is by Jasoon, whose images on Flickr Creative Commons  can be viewed at:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jasoon/
/ CC BY 2.0