2013

Welcome to 2013 and the Lunar New Year in the Chinese Year of the Snake.

‘The Snake is the sixth sign of the Chinese Zodiac, which consists of 12 Animal Signs. It is the enigmatic, intuitive, introspective, refined and collected of the Animals Signs. Ancient Chinese wisdom says a Snake in the house is a good omen because it means that your family will not starve.’

The United Nations has declared 2013 the International Year of Water Cooperation (SCIS no.  1582371) as well as the International Year of Quinoa (SCIS no. 1592685)

In the world of colour AkzoNobel declares Indigo  (SCIS no. 1592774)  is a striking statement colour for 2013 associated with wisdom and honesty which enhances your environment.  However Pantone Color of the year 2013 is Emerald Green (SCIS no. 1592779)

2013 is also the International Year of Statistics,  (SCIS no. 1592783) a worldwide event supported by more than 1,400 organizations. More than 100 scientific societies, universities, research institutes, and organizations all over the world have banded together to dedicate 2013 as a special year for the Mathematics of Planet Earth. (SCIS no. 1592783)

The European Commission has designated that 2013 will be the European Year of Citizens (SCIS no. 1592791) while Scotland has declared 2013 the Year of Natural Scotland (SCIS no. 1592797)

Pope Benedict XVI declared that a Year of Faith (SCIS  no. 1592806) will begin on October 11, 2012 and conclude on November 24, 2013.  World Youth Day 2013 (SCIS no. 1592887) to be held in Rio theme is… ‘Go and make disciples of all nations’

For International Women’s day March 8 2013 the theme is The Gender Agenda: Gaining Momentum (SCIS no. 1592879)

Red Quinoa by  Pru MItchell
Red Quinoa by Pru MItchell

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can find more pictures  here from the Global Year of Quinoa

Splash Teacher Collections

ABC Splash is not just a series of video clips to use with your students.  Check out the Teachers Area (SCIS no: 1592621) with its four teachers collections which feature areas of focus, topics and assessment tasks with links to videos and other teaching resources both within the collection or online.

Genetically engineered crops: SCIS no: 1592621

Improving your writing English: SCIS no: 1592630

From paddock to plate: SCIS no: 1592635

Finding scientific solutions: SCIS no: 1592636

 

SCIS asks: ScOT and subject access

In the subject access session of the SCIS consultation on 4 December 2012, Les Kneebone Project Manager of the Schools Online Thesaurus (ScOT) presented an exciting overview of recent developments in the ScOT thesaurus. Key features that position ScOT for the future include:

  • its ongoing development with input from cataloguers, curriculum developers, subject matter experts and users
  • its use to describe the machine-readable Australian Curriculum
  • its linked data API facilitating automatic semantic relationships
  • its translation into languages including Chinese, Indonesian, Japanese and Māori
  • its use to describe a wide range of resources through the National Digital Learning Resource Network and SCIS

Discussion followed as to future directions for SCIS in the area of subject access.

Les Kneebone
Les Kneebone presents an overview of ScOT

The ScOT in SCIS project commenced in 2006 when the thinking was that keyword searching would become the pre-eminent means of resource retrieval. Since then SCIS has offered schools the option of downloading both SCIS Subject Headings and ScOT terms in their catalogue records. The challenge is how to manage and display both SCIS subject headings and ScOT terms in a meaningful way for users in order to exploit the inferred links between resources tagged with ScOT terms that match a curriculum tagged with ScOT terms.

Also discussed was an alternative scenario of transition from use of SCIS Subject Headings to ScOT terms and how schools would manage this process.

SCIS asks – Resource Description and Access (RDA)

As part of the SCIS consultation on 4 December 2012 Renate Beilharz from Box Hill Institute provided an introduction to Resource Description and Access (RDA)  and its benefits for education libraries.

The Statement of purpose for RDA states:

Renate talks about RDA
Renate talks about RDA

RDA will be a new standard for resource description and access, designed for the digital world.
Built on foundations established by the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules (AACR), RDA will provide a comprehensive set of guidelines and instructions on resource description and access covering all types of content and media.
RDA will enable users of library catalogues and other systems of information organization to find, identify, select, and obtain resources appropriate to their information needs.

During the period of RDA development, the library and cataloguing world updated some key cataloguing principles and developed some conceptual models for resource discovery. RDA is built on these new conceptual models.

If we remember that the highest principle of the International Cataloguing Principles is the ‘convenience of the user’ RDA has aligned with the ICP principles: find, identify, select, obtain.  Through  RDA we can practise what we preach and work to improve search results and the way these results are displayed. RDA is very much about the user and functionality; focused on users – not items.

The RDA cataloguing standard is designed precisely for an online environment. RDA’s element set has been clearly defined, and incorporated into the Open Metadata Registry, which is a set of RDF-based controlled vocabularies, and a fundamental piece of technical infrastructure for the Semantic Web.

Renate’s overview led into a presentation by SCIS Cataloguing Team Leader, Pam Kadow, outlining proposed changes to the SCIS Standards for Cataloguing and Data Entry for alignment with RDA commencing the second quarter of 2013.

ABC Splash

ABC Splash is now live at splash.abc.net.au

This is the first release of ABC Splash which currently contains video resources, learning objects and a sample of teacher resources and featured collections presented as e-books.

This is an exciting partnership  between the Australian Broadcasting Corporation and Education Services Australia who are picking content from the ABC archives and contemporary shows to help teachers plan for the Australian Curriculum.  All the resources on the site are free to watch and can be accessed from home or from school

The following featured collections have a variety of resources for teaching and learning

Earthquakes: when the Earth shakes   SCIS No: 1592751

Upper primary: Year 6 | Secondary: Years 7, 8

Palaeontology: Unlocking secrets of the past   SCIS No: 1592754

Upper primary: Years 5, 6 | Secondary: Years 7, 8

From fossils to fuels   SCIS No: 1592762

Upper primary: Year 6 | Secondary: Years 7, 8

The evolution of the Australian family home   SCIS No: 1592758

Secondary: Years 9, 10

Democracies in action   SCIS No: 1592763

Secondary: Years 9, 10

Rights and freedoms   SCIS No: 1592765

Secondary: Years 10

Renewable energy   SCIS No: 1592769

Secondary: Years 9, 10

Great Barrier Reef: Under Threat   SCIS No: 15927568

Upper primary: Years 5, 6 | Secondary: Years 7, 8

Great Barrier Reef: Under Threat
Great Barrier Reef: Under Threat

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can follow Splash on twitter and on Facebook for updates.

What about e-books?

At SCIS workshops a popular topic of discussion is e-books in school libraries. This blog post provides an update on what SCIS is doing about e-books.

What e-books will I find in SCIS?

SCIS catalogues e-books from a number of publishers and vendors. In most cases schools are unable to send e-books to their SCIS cataloguing agency (due to digital rights and access restrictions) so we are reliant on publishers and e-book system providers for the access that allows us to catalogue e-books.

Note that as titles may be available from more than one e-book supplier SCIS is in the process of changing its cataloguing standards to favour provision of provider-neutral e-book records that do not link to a specific supplier.

SCIS regularly catalogues e-books from the following  e-book providers and vendors

Screen shot from SCIS catalogue
Subject search for e-books in the SCIS catalogue

What about free e-books?

SCIS catalogues Project Gutenberg and public domain e-book material on request from schools if they are seen to be relevant to curriculum or literature programs across a range of schools.
Search the SCIS Catalogue for Project Gutenberg e-books [login required].

What if I can’t find an e-book record in SCIS?

We are keen to ensure that the e-book resources schools are acquiring are catalogued promptly.
Contact your SCIS cataloguing agency with details of the resource you have purchased and we will investigate how to access this in order to catalogue it.

What to read next?

SCIS subscribes to LibraryThing for Libraries which has a ‘similar books’ display that matches books based on what members own and tag in the social reading platform LibraryThing.

Look at the SCIS Catalogue screen [subscription required] for a popular title such as ‘Diary of a Wimpy Kid’ and wait for the bottom section of the page to load. There you should see a table of Similar books which will give your students (and teachers) a range of options of further titles to check out. There are 8 suggestions in the table for each title, but by clicking on one of the suggestions you can get another 8 suggestions.

There are also reviews available (77 reviews for Diary of a wimpy kid) – many of them written by students.

Note: This content requires a subscription to LibraryThing for Libraries so the similar books and reviews will not download into your library system with the SCIS catalogue record. Use your school’s SCIS login to give students and teachers access to these ideas via SCIS Catalogue searches.

SCIS and Scan

Scan is a quarterly, professional refereed journal produced by the NSW Department of Education and Communities. It focuses on the interaction between information in a digital age and effective student learning.

What’s in Scan?

Articles and school stories plus resources reviewed from a curriculum perspective, plus research and research-based articles.

Contact the Scan Editor for further information or visit the School Libraries and Information Literacy website for a subscription form.

Connect to a taster of articles from Scan this year.

Research columns
Dr James E. Herring presents the findings of a study which explored the views of Year 7 students on information literacy practices and discusses the implications for teacher librarians and teachers.

In the second research article, Mal Lee considers what it means for schools to be networked communities. The practical implications and potentials are illustrated with reference to Broulee Public School.

Reviews

Scan resource icons

Each issue of Scan includes 80+ e-resource and website reviews as well as picture books, fiction, professional and information resources reviews and more. Reviews for e-resources, including e-books and apps, indicate fees, registration or devices as needed. Icons (see table) are used for quick reference.

SCIS and Scan

SCIS record numbers and barcodes are provided with Scan reviews to facilitate creating orders in SCISWeb.

SCIS records for resources reviewed in Scan are also available for download in bulk as SCIS Special Order files [SCISWeb log in required].

Want some websites?

The National Library of New Zealand Services to Schools team maintains a set of high interest topics pages with links to selected quality websites on topics such as SeasonsWearable Art, Brain Science and the Rugby World Cup 2011.

We have selected these resources to help you when you need online information relating to popular curriculum based topics. To make sure the resources are appropriate we’ve used the following standard criteria: accuracy, authority, coverage, currency and objectivity.

High interest topics from National Library of NZ

Add these topics to your library catalogue

SCIS provides MARC records for a range of websites each month and these are available for selection and download via the SCIS Special Order Files new SCIS websites page [SCIS login required]. Use the Last month option to preview websites added recently (including the National Library of NZ topics) and select those appropriate for your library.

To order and download SCIS records specifically for the National Library of New Zealand’s high interest topics:

  1. Open the document: SCIS numbers for NLNZ topics  [Word format]
  2. Delete any topics you don’t wish to download
  3. Hover over the left hand column of this table until the black downward arrow appears. Click to highlight the column, and then copy the SCIS numbers
  4. Paste these into the SCIS Create Orders box and click the Process Order button [SCIS login required]
  5. Save the usmarc.dat file from the SCIS Orders table to your computer, and import it to your library management system.
  6. Check by title or subject that the records display as you expect them in your library catalogue’s search module.

If you know you want the full set of 47 topics then open this file of SCIS NLNZ order numbers only. Then copy and paste the SCIS order numbers into the SCIS Create Orders box and click the Process Order button [SCIS login required].

Want more websites?
Do let us know what kind of websites and topics you are looking for in SCIS.

One world, many stories

The displays are up, the winners and honour books are announced and the Children’s Book Council of Australia’s Book Week 2011 celebrations have begun.

In the months leading up to Book Week school library staff have been planning, creating and publishing lessons, activities and displays – in both their physical and online library spaces. Library email lists have been full of people sharing ideas, resources and tips for where to purchase that special display item.

One World, Many Stories display by Brenda, Marden Education Centre Library, SA

While it is impossible to acknowledge everyone who has contributed to the Book Week commons, the following links provide a few examples of the creative ideas, the shared resources and the range of technology tools used for Book Week related activities.

We would love to hear about Book Week in your school.
Post a comment on the blog or email us.